2/24/13

Rhymeland Quilt

Well, may I just say I  the internet!  Today I was contacted by "Sherry" via email.  Sherry informed me that she had been following the progress of the Two Grandmother's quilt.


She went on to say:  "In 1986 through 1989 I took a Folk Arts Apprenticeship with a Master Folk Artist and I recognize your pattern right away as part of my study."  Sherry has been able to identify the quilt pattern as the Rhymeland Quilt, designed by Ruby Short McKim.  With the name of the pattern and designer, I have been able to find a wealth of information online about the origins of my quilt!  I am so excited about this!

When I first blogged about this project, I was aware that there was a time when newspapers published applique patterns, quilt patterns, and embroidery patterns.  I tried to find some information about this particular quilt on the internet, but without the actual name of the quilt, I was unable to find anything.  I simply had an idea that these designs were probably published in the newspaper that my mother's family read.  As it turns out, they were originally published  in the Beloit, Kansas “Daily Call” newspaper as a weekly pattern series from 1935 – 1936.  My mother and her family were living either in Nebraska or Idaho at the time, and so the series must have been republished in their local newspaper.  The original pattern had 28 blocks, although my mother gave me just 27 embroidered blocks and two blank squares.  I used 25 in the quilt, and I used the two extras and the two blanks to make a pillow, which I believe is still in my cedar chest.  Apparently, she didn't finish one of the blocks.  I wonder which one she left out.

You can see another version of the quilt at OnlineQuilter.com.  The image below is of a quilt made by Shirley McElderry.  Her version is hand embroidered and hand quilted according to the original layout.  You can see more detailed images of the quilt by clicking on the link I have given you.


Martha Dellasega Gray also made a quilt from the same pattern and it is pictured on her blog at Q is for Quilter.  She also has kindly provided a link to a free pdf  of all of the original patterns, including their original text and pattern layout.

The designer Ruby Short McKim was widely known for her designs that were syndicated in newspapers all over the country beginning in 1916.  You can read a short biography about her right here.  

What a thrill to have this additional information about my quilt.  Thank you, Sherry.  You made my day today!

26 comments from clever and witty friends:

Sheila said...

What great information to complete your journey.

Larissa said...

How lovely that Sherry could identify the quilt for you, and that you were then able to find out so much more information about this darling quilt! Thanks for sharing the links - its wonderful that we have the opportunity to see quilts these days in their many different versions, depending on how each quilter has adapted the designs! ... And thankyou for sharing the pdf link!! This is such a lovely design, I think I might decide to make one of my own sometime in the future!! Would be a fabulous stitchery project to have to work on when out and about waiting for appointments or the like :)

Quilting Babcia said...

Wow! What an amazing story to go with your Two Grandmothers Quilt! The power of the internet never ceases to amaze. I had just happened on the site with the bio of Ruby Short McKim last week, linked from another blog. I've copied the pdf pattern for possible future use too. Thanks for sharing this sweet story as it continues to grow.

Teresa in Music City said...

Downright awesome!!!!

Rachel said...

That is SO fabulous! I want to thank Sherry too, while I may not have a quilt like this, I still love the history behind it!

Marj said...

Your quilt turned out awesome! Thank you for sharing the total story of the blocks. It makes me want to create my own baby quilt for my someday grandchild to be.

quiltzyx said...

The interwebs strike again! How wonderful of Sherry to write & let you know the origins of the quilt pattern. Hooray!!

Junebug613 said...

Yay for Sherry being so thoughtful and informative! It's so nice for you to have more history to go with your quilt. Thanks for sharing it all with us too!

Lee said...

Beautiful, and thank you for sharing the origins. And did you notice that on #9 (Tom the Pipers Son), your grandmother did not make the error with leaving the leg off the 'R' - she did it exactly as the pattern showed! Fascinating :)

Kathy Felsted Usher said...

The wonders of the internet- it's what you do with it and this time it was so helpful! That's great that you now have more history to add to the quilt.

Dana Gaffney said...

How cool is that!

Kate said...

How very cool! Are you going to add any of that information to the quilt label?

Debbie said...

That is an amazing quilt tale....you could only learn the "rest of the story" by completing the quilt! The quilt is just a wonderful finish.

quilary said...

What a great journey of quiltmaking and storytelling - the quilt has turned out beautifully.

Diane Wild said...

What fun to find the origin and history of your quilt. It makes it all the more precious. Wow.

Needled Mom said...

Isn't the internet amazing? I'm so glad you found out so much about the pattern.

Dar said...

That is a treasure of information for your treasure of a quilt. I love it when you know the history of a quilt or it's origins. Beautiful work on all quilts.

Ranch Wife said...

Oh, yes - 3 cheers for the Internet! Its so awesome that you now have the history behind the original pattern. I love quilts that come with a story! Yours will be rich with that!

Urmelche said...

Beautiful and you did and oustanding job, thank you much for posting the link

txquilter said...

I would love to subscribe to the "Q is for Quilter" blog, but can't figure out how. Can ask Martha to tell me how? My email is goldwingsummers@aol.com.

Love your quilt! What a family treasure it will be.

Suzanne

Brown Family said...

It is lovely! Pleas know the following does not mean to take anything away from your beautiful quilt! I know I am bored when I start looking at things that are not important. You got me to wondering what blocks you did not use and which one your Mom did not do. Silly, I know. I could have ask you, but it entertained me for a while!

Bobby Shafto,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Shafto%27s_Gone_to_Sea

Little Tommy Tucker,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Tommy_Tucker

and Lucy Locket
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Locket

are not in your quilt. Your Queen is in Sing a song of Six Pence but the queen on the pattern is the queen of hearts. Same picture, different words. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Queen_of_Hearts_%28poem%29

I know I am silly for looking, but Curiosity killed the cat and we do not want that!

Judy1522 said...

I was also curious about the one that your mother didn't give you and was going to check yours with the other quilt to see which 3 were not in it. Glad I didn't since I see someone else already did. That is so great to know the story behind the quilt pattern. It really is a very special quilt.

Cheryl's Teapots2Quilting said...

I just read about Ruby in a book on old quilts, last night. I was just thinking that I needed to google her, but, decided to read a few more blogs first. Glad I did!

Pattilou said...

What an interesting, delightful journey this quilt has provided for you. I love, love, love how you restored it. Pleasant memories for sure.

Denise :) said...

Barbara ... I knew I'd seen these somewhere!!! I love Martha's blog -- she shares the most terrific stuff and especially the patterns for fun stitcheries! I blogged about her before Christmas http://daneesey.blogspot.com/2012/12/why-does-santa-have-garden.html. It cracks me up -- I've had that pattern downloaded for months and months. LOL! If I recall correctly -- weren't there a couple of blocks you wondered about?? How nice that the patterns have the stories of each of the rhyme characters! :)

Lynne said...

How exciting! It gives the already beautiful quilt such depth having that background story.